Cinematic Program

Venue: Carrillo Gantner Theatre, Sidney Myer Asia Centre, The University of Melbourne

ALL FREE ENTRY or get your free tickets now on: http://2013aperturefestival.eventbrite.com.au

Carrillo Gantner Theatre

Carrillo Gantner Theatre

Thursday, 21 November 2013

Friday, 22 November 2013

Saturday, 23 November 2013

Click to download Festival Schedule (pdf)
Click to download Festival Booklet (pdf)

watch all available trailers here

OPENING FILM
Thursday, 21 November 2013
4pm - 7.30pm

01 Gandhi's Children_still
Gandhi's Children / India / David MacDougall / Australia / 2008 / 185 min

A shelter for children on the outskirts of Delhi provides food and accommodation for 350 boys. Some are orphans, others have been abandoned, still others have run away from home. About half are held under a court order, having been picked up from the streets for petty crimes. Living at the institution for several months, the filmmaker explores its routines and the varied experiences of several boys. Despite the harshness of their lives, many show remarkable strength of character, knowledge, and resilience. One day 181 child labourers arrive, placing additional strain on the building’s deteriorating facilities. The institution does what it can, but is it enough?

About the director
David MacDougall is an ethnographic filmmaker and writer on cinema. With his wife, Judith MacDougall, he made a number of films on the Jie and Turkana of East Africa in the 1960s and 1970s, followed by a dozen films on indigenous communities in Australia, and Photo Wallahs (1991), about photographic practices in an Indian hill town. In 1997 MacDougall began a five-part film study of the Doon School in northern India, studies of the Rishi Valley School in South India, including SchoolScapes (2007) and (with Judith MacDougall) Awareness (2010), and a shelter for homeless children in New Delhi, resulting in Gandhi’s Children (2008). MacDougall writes regularly on documentary and ethnographic cinema and is the author of Transcultural Cinema and The Corporeal Image: Film, Ethnography, and the Senses. He is presently Adjunct Professor at the Australian National University, where he is conducting the research project, “Childhood and Modernity: Indian Children's Perspectives”.

Eventbrite button_free tickets

Back to Top

MIGRATION Session
Friday, 22 November 2013
9am - 11am (2 films)

02 Path of Light_still
Path of Light / Malaysia & Indonesia / Monica Figueredo / Canada-Uruguay / 2012 / 24 min

Path of light tells the harrowing tale of Nur, a muslim Javanese mother who in an effort to provide for her family, travels to Malaysia to become a domestic worker. After 8 years of enslavement by her employers, denied communication with family and not paid for her services, Nur decides to risk her life to flee her captors and return home. All her documents were taken from her by her employer the moment she arrived, without ID, Nur’s escape involves 3 days of hiding in the jungle with other Indonesian refugees. The boat arrives in the middle of the night and in order to evade being caught, the refugees must swim to the boat. Not knowing how to swim, Nur looses consciousness and is left for dead on the beach. Hours later she is found and taken to Tenaganita, a migrant worker shelter where she begins the long road to rehabilitation. Two years pass before she is reunited with her family who presumed Nur had died.

About the director
Monica Figueredo is an Artist/Filmmaker born in Montevideo, Uruguay and raised in Toronto,Canada. She graduated from Ontario College of Art University in Toronto. She is the recipient of the Charles Street Video Art Award in 2009, and has worked as a filmmaker on a series of short documentaries for The Paradigm Shift Project, a Canadian NGO based in Indonesia. Some of her projects included; H2ope: Water to People Everywhere, Breaking Chains, Building Communities:Ending Sex Trafficking and Voicing Disaster:Responding as Global Citizens to Natural Disasters. She is currently working on experimental video projects for her own practice.

--

03 Promise and Unrest_still
Promise and Unrest / Philippines & Ireland / Alan Grossman & Aine O'Brien / South Africa & Ireland / 2010 / 79 min

Australian Premiere
watch trailer

Through struggle and sacrifice migrant women often stand as sole breadwinners in thefamily. Separated from her daughter Gracelle at 7 months, Noemi Barredo left thePhilippines for work in Malaysia before arriving in Ireland in 2000. Filmed over a fiveyear period, 'Promise and Unrest' is an intimate portrayal of a migrant womanperforming caregiving and long-distance motherhood, while assuming the responsibilityof providing for her extended family in the Philippines. Through the camera lens, thefilm observes the everyday intricacies of Noemi and Gracelle’s relationship, theirsubsequent reunion in Ireland through the `right to family reunification‘, and thebeginnings of a domestic life together in the same country for the first time. The film’snarrative arc is shaped by the mother-daughter voiceover scripted by Noemi andGracelle themselves, deliberately staged in two languages: the mother tongue Waray dialect spoken by Noemi in dialogue with an emerging adolescent and accented English – a new and acquired idiom that Gracelle is forced to learn in a new country.

About the director
Alan Grossman is a South African ethnographic filmmaker, academic and Director of the Centre for Transcultural Research and Media Practice, DIT (www.ctmp.ie) He has a longstanding production involvement with questions of migration and cultural identity across different transnational contexts. He co-directed Silent Song (2000, UK) about an exiled Kurdish musician in Scotland who, in 1976, refused to perform at a Ba’athist Party convention in Baghdad, together with Here To Stay (2006, Ireland), an observational film capturing the expression of migrant political agency in multiracial Ireland. He is co-editor of a combined book/DVD-ROM titled Projecting Migration: Transcultural Documentary Practice (Wallflower Press, 2007).

Áine O’Brien is an Irish academic, filmmaker and Co-Director of Counterpoints Arts in London (http://counterpointsarts.org.uk) – a hub of creative arts and cultural projects exploring refugee and migrant experiences. She co-directed a performative documentary film (Silent Song, UK, 2000) on Kurdish lyrical protest in Europe and an observational film on the subject of economic migration into Ireland (Here to Stay, Ireland, 72 mins, 2006), funded by the Irish Film Board. She is co-editor of Projecting Migration: Transcultural Documentary Practice (Wallflower Press, 2007).

Eventbrite button_free tickets

Back to Top

PARTICIPATORY FILMS Session
Friday, 22 November 2013
1.20pm - 3.20pm (2 films)
Q&A with Anjali Monteiro and K.P. Jayasankar, directors of "Naata (The Bond)"

04 We Want (U) To Know_still
We Want (U) to Know / Cambodia / Ella Pugliese, Nou Va and the people of Thnol Lok / Italy & Cambodia / 2011 / 54 min

Australian Premiere
watch trailer

WE WANT (U) TO KNOW reveals how Cambodians are struggling to cope with painful memories at the time of the Khmer Rouge Tribunal. This is a participatory film: Villagers from all around the country take the camera in their hands to document what they have gone through during and after the Khmer Rouge era. Through sharing their stories with the young generation, survivors are breaking 30 years of silence and initiating a powerful discourse about the challenges of the present. The big screen under the trees becomes a public space for confrontation, a sign of hope beyond this film.

About the director
Ella Pugliese (Rome, 1974), a degree in Languages and a MA in Migration Studies with focus on Audio-Visual Anthropology, lives and works in Berlin as a freelance Author and Filmmaker. In the past years she has collected field experiences in refugee and roma camps from Naples to Algeria, she has worked for international research institutes dealing with migration issues and she has collaborated with Film schools as well as TV satellite Channels. She has co-directed photographed and edited several documentary projects with an anthropological focus, like The Puppetmasters, about local tradition, art and memory in Southern Italy’s countryside. In Berlin she conducts workshops with NGOs and in schools applying participatory practices with youngsters.

Nou Va (Pursat, 1979), a Bachelor of Arts of Law and one of Education, has been working since years for NGOs dealing with Human Rights in Phnom Penh. In the last years he has collaborated and/or coordinated outreach projects on Khmer Rouge Tribunal, Victims Assistance and Protection, and he has been training volunteers all over the country to become "Citizen Advisors", citizen aware of the Cambodian legal system.

--
05 Naata (The Bond)_still
Naata (The Bond) / India / Anjali Monteiro & K.P. Jayasankar / India / 2003 / 45 min

Australian Premiere
watch trailer

Naata is about Bhau Korde and Waqar Khan, two activists and friends, who have been involved in conflict resolution, working with neighbourhood peace committees in Dharavi, Mumbai, reputedly, the largest ‘slum’ in Asia. This film explores their work, which has included the collective production and use of visual media for ethnic amity. Waqar and Bhau’s work raises several uncomfortable questions for the filmmakers, so-called modern, middle-class, secular, urban beings. Naata juxtaposes the multi-layered narrative on Dharavi and the ‘stories’ of the filmmakers, thereby attempting to foreground a critical and active viewership. Naata is the second in a series on the people and the city of Mumbai.

About the director
Anjali Monteiro and K.P. Jayasankar are Professors at the School of Media and Cultural Studies, Tata Institute of Social Sciences, Mumbai. Monteiro has a Masters degree in Economics and a Ph.D. in Sociology. Jayasankar has an M.A. in German Studies and a Ph.D. in Humanities and Social Sciences. Both of them are involved in media production, teaching and research. . A presiding thematic of much of their work has been a problematising of notions of self and the other, of normality and deviance, of the local and the global, through the exploration of diverse narratives and rituals. Jointly they have won thirty national and international awards for their films. Their most recent award is the Basil Wright Prize for So Heddan So Hoddan (Like Here Like There) at the 13th RAI International Festival of Ethnographic Film 2013. An adaptation of their film ‘Saacha‘ (The Loom) is a part of the exhibition ‘Project Space: Word. Sound. Power.‘ currently showing at the Tate Modern, London. They have several papers in the area of media and cultural studies. They also serve as visiting faculty to several institutions in India and abroad and are currently at the University of Technology, Sydney as visiting professor/fellow,for a semester.

Eventbrite button_free tickets

Back to Top

WOMEN'S RIGHTS Session
Friday, 22 November 2013
3.40pm - 6pm (3 films)
Q&A with Dr Yaso Nadarajah, Senior Research Fellow, RMIT University, one of the lead researchers of "From Machang To Kajang"

06 Wayward and Stubborn_still
Wayward and Stubborn / Bangladesh / Stefania Donaera / Italy / 2013 / 29 min

World Premiere

There are no official statistics but it’s estimated that in Bangladesh each year about 200 women are attacked with acid. A woman can be assaulted for refusing a proposal, for unmet demands for dowry, even for being outspoken. She can simply be accused of being wayword and stubborn and therefore men can punish her in the most terrible way. Nahar was a 15 years old student when a boy who had proposed her and she had refused, threw acid and disfigured her. After a number of reconstructive surgeries and years of psychological counseling she found a way out of isolation and got the strength to start herlife anew. Today she travels across Bangladesh home after home, village after village to help those who faced the same tragedy.
 

About the director
Stefania Donaera has been working in the NGO sector for the last ten years focusing mainly in promoting the development issue with media. She has collaborated as executive producer in documentaries in India, Brasil, Guatemala, Mozambique, Tanzania and South Africa. Francilene – story of a babaçu nut breaker, her first documentary as author and director, has won the award “best Sardinian author” at the SIEFF (Sardinian Ethnographic Film Festival) and has been screend at the Al Jazeera Film Festival.

--
07 Much Ado About Knotting_still
Much Ado About Knotting / India / Geetika Narang Abbasi & Anandana Kapur / India / 2012 / 55 min

Melbourne Premiere
watch trailer

Born into a society obsessed with marriages, a young girl, a not-so-youngman and an NRI (Non-Resident Indian) couple are compelled by tradition tolook for matches via classifieds, matchmaking bureaus and websites.Confronted with innumerable criteria that determine who is acceptable andwho isn’t, they question themselves and their choices. As they introspect, themelee of the matchmaking industry continues. At every turn, there are service providers who are ready to snoop, style and solicit potentials on their behalf.People are searching for the ideal one endlessly and the oft-heard question is – When are you getting married? Much Ado About Knotting is a lightheartedchronicle of this very predicament that almost every Indian faces.

About the director
GEETIKA NARANG ABBASI: Geetika Narang Abbasi is an independent filmmaker from India. Her debut film was the multiple award-winning short ‘Good Night’ (2008). She edits and directs documentaries, short films, and ad films.

ANANDANA KAPUR: Anandana Kapur is an independent filmmaker and social scientist based out of New Delhi, India. Her works include the critically acclaimed and award-winning documentary ‘The Great Indian Jugaad’ (2009).

--
08 From Machang to Kajang_still
From Machang to Kajang / Malaysia / Jules Ong / Malaysia / 2012 / 25 min

World Premiere

From Machang to Kajang, is a documentary film about Mat Akib, a polygamous man with two wives. How does Mat Akib juggle the two familieswho live in different towns in Malaysia? Twice a month, he drives for six hours between Machang and Kajang to fulfil his responsibility as a husband and father to his wives and seven children. This he does religiously despite feeling unwell on the day of filming. His wives have their own judgements about him. And his children from his first marriage are less than forgiving for having “abandoned” them for another wife. The film was made following a nationwide research on polygamy (and its discontents) by Sisters In Islam, an organisation that research and advocates for Muslim women’s rights. This documentary chronicles the livedreality of a polygamous family in Malaysia.

About the director
Jules ONG has 15 years experience in the media specialising in writing and reporting on the environment, society and politics of Malaysia and Asia. He worked with Al-Jazeera English as a researcher and producer for award-winning programme Everywoman, 101 East, a current affairs programme on Asia, and business show Counting the Cost. Jules has also worked as a correspondent for Radio68H Jakarta on its flagship English radio programme Asia Calling. As a freelance filmmaker since 2009, Jules Ong directs and produces documentary films on environmental and social justice for public awareness and advocacy. He also co-produces news and current affairs for international broadcasters on interesting subjects in Malaysia. Jules currently lives in Kuala Lumpur.

Eventbrite button_free tickets

Back to Top

SEX TRADE AND ABUSE Session
Saturday, 23 November 2013
12.10pm - 1pm (2 films)

09 Lives Under the Red Light_still
Lives Under the Red Light / Cambodia / Vanna Hem / Cambodia / 2013 / 14 min

Australian Premiere
watch trailer

Lives living as gay lesbian trangender in Cambodia seem not really have much freedom as other people. They are still facing with discrimination. All of these issues leading them living in the dead lock situation in Cambodia and many of them starting involve in drug, prostitution....because they have no choice. No one give them job, some of them were kicked out from their families.Lives Under the Red Light is the film which show the reality of their lives. All the protagonists in the film are working as the sex worker in Phnom Penh. They are facing alot of discrimination from the society and turned their lives to have a work in the risky situation being sex worker.They all experienced forced sex, group sex and force drug used from tourists and local clients.

About the director
My name’s Vanna Hem, Cambodian film maker born in 1984. I started to work related in Media and film industry in 2008 with a local NGO called Support Children and Young People ( SCY), I worked there for 3 years and my job responsibility was training young reporters how to produce film documentaries. In year 2010 I moved to work in Cambodian German Cultural Center ( Meta House) as the film coordinator. I have improved my experienced a lot in film producing through film training course and involve working with some projects with international filmmakers. In 2010 I started to work as a freelance film maker and I was asked to produced some films for local NGOs here. There are 7 films I have produced by myself and 6 of them related to lady boys issue in Cambodia. In producing film, I am usually in the position of cameraman, script writing, and producer. Beside making film, I have been involved with making commercial TV spots with local film makers and I was selected to be a model in 2 TV spots and acting in a short film.

--
10 Standing on the Edge of a Thorn_still
Standing on the Edge of a Thorn / Indonesia / Robert Lemelson / USA / 2012 / 32 min

Asia Pacific Premiere
watch trailer

“Standing on the Edge of a Thorn” is an intimate portrait of a family in rural Indonesia grappling with poverty, mental illness, and participation in the sex trade. Shot over the course of 12 years, the film centers on Imam Rohani, a former civil servant struggling with a mental disorder, who takes in Tri, an unwed pregnant teenager 30 years his junior. Imam refuses to marry Tri, which would have made her an accepted member of the village. Instead, the couple are scorned by the other villagers and become isolated. Over time, trapped by traditional values that stigmatize their relationship, Imam and Tri sink even deeper into destitution and make a series of choices that lead Tri into a life of prostitution and violence.

About the director
Dr. Robert Lemelson is a documentary filmmaker and anthropologist whose work focuses on personal experience, culture and mental illness in Indonesia and the United States.   Dr. Lemelson is an adjunct professor at the University of California, Los Angeles’ Department of Anthropology and a research anthropologist at the University's internationally renowned Semel Institute of Neuroscience and Human Behavior in its Center for Culture and Health. He is also the founder and CEO of Los Angeles-based documentary film company Elemental Productions, which brings together scholars with Hollywood filmmakers to create educational and impactful content.

Eventbrite button_free tickets

Back to Top

LIVELIHOOD IN THE ASIA PACIFIC Session
Saturday, 23 November 2013
1.10pm - 2.40pm (3 films)

11 The Floating Nurse_still
Suster Apung (The Floating Nurse) / Indonesia / Arfan Sabran / Indonesia / 2006 / 15 min

Australian Premiere
watch trailer

Hj. Rabiah has been assigned as a nurse for 28 years in Liukang Tangaya archipelago, a remote place in south part of Sulawesi island, in the middle of Flores Sea. As a nurse, she's definitely not an ordinary nurse. She sail through billow and crossing the boundaries of nurse authority. The minimum facility from all of those desolated places never fails her.

About the director
Arfan Sabran was born in Makassar, 12 October 1981. Despite his academic degree in Biology, his passion in cinematography had lead him to became a documentary filmmaker. He pursued his interest in filmmaking since 2005. Until today, he has made 12 short films, documentary and fiction, also 1 feature fiction. His collection includes “Suster Apung” which won the Best Film in the Eagle Awards Documentary Competition 2006; and “My Pikko” which won the Best Script in the Swedish Digital Filmmaking Workshop 2007. His documentary “Paotere” was produced in the practical film workshop program by ECCO Films Indonesia, in which he received direct guidance from a worldrenowned documentary filmmaker and Grand Prize Jury winner of the Sundance Film Festival 2007, Leonard Retel Helmrich. He also make some documentaries for NGO and become a line producer with some international documentary co-production. Now he developt his new feature documentary about life of local community in Indonesia's remote island.

--

12 The Old Man Who Sells Bananas_still
The Old Man Who Sells Bananas / Vietnam / Tu Thi Thu Hang / Vietnam / 2012 / 39 min

Melbourne Premiere
watch trailer

The main character of the film is an 84 -year-old hump-backed man, in brown clothes, with a (palm-leave conical) hat and a bike full of bananas... People can't help being astonished when seeing such an old man making a living by such a hark work - cycling 50 km everyday to peddle bananas. Who is he? Does he have a family? Why does an old man like him still have to make a living that way?

About the director
I graduated Telecommunication Electric Department, Hanoi Open University in 2002 and start to work at Cultural heritage Data Center in Vietnam institute of Culture and Arts Studies (VICAS) until now. My main job is montage films for Cultural heritage Data Center and manage databank system.

--

13 Wawata Topu_still
Wawata Topu Mermaids of Timor-Leste / East Timor / David Palazón & Enrique Alonso / Spain / 2013 /33 min

Australian Premiere
watch trailer

Wawata topu (women divers) are four generations of fisherwomen striving to make a living in the costal village of Adara, West Atauro, Timor-Leste. Their daily lives, their economic practices and their vital concerns, as well as the contradicting discourses and social barriers they face, are shown in this ethnographic portrait that makes visible their critical contribution to the household economies and the fishing community at large. Their underwater dancing takes place in a context of rapid social change, where the generalization of the formal education, the progressive consolidation of western moral values and the potential openness of more attractive livelihoods not linked to the sea, seem to be forging a social negotiation of the household economic strategies initiated by the oldest generation during the 60´s.

About the director
David Palazón is originally from Barcelona and moved to London to study Media & Design at the LCC and RCA, becoming an associate lecturer in 2005 at the University of the Arts London and setting the cross-college Artepreneurs program, while working as an independent visual artist in the areas of filmmaking and design. He established himself in Timor-Leste in 2008 and collaborated in several cultural projects with local and international organisations as well as the government of this young nation. Among a long list of projects in the country, between 2009 and 2012 he conducted a cross-country cultural research mapping project in collaboration with Griffith University and the Secretary of State for Arts & Culture in Timor-Leste. In 2010 he produced and co-edited Uma Lulik (The Sacred House), the first documentary made by an East Timorese filmmaker (Victor de Sousa) to reach international audiences and to receiving the 3rd audience award at BIFF 2011.

Enrique Alonso holds a Ba in Sociology, a Ma in Coastal and Marine Resource Management and a PhD in Social & Cultural Anthropology by the University of A Coruña, Spain. He has received the Extraordinary Doctorate Prize and was awarded with the Spanish National Prize of Cultural Research “Marqués de Lozoya” for his work “Risk, Culture and Work. A Case Study in a Spanish Galician Fishery”. With research experience in both urban and rural contexts in Spain and Timor-Leste, he has focused attention on fishing communities. Research topics included marine and coastal governance, human-nature relatedness, risk management, food security, kinship, generation and gender systems, working processes and economic practices. Since 2010 he worked as Technical Advisor for the Spanish funded and FAO executed Regional Fisheries Livelihoods Programme for South and Southeast Asia (RFLP) in Timor-Leste. Currently he works as consultant and is visiting fellow at the University of Salamanca, Spain.

Eventbrite button_free tickets

Back to Top

IDENTITY AND BELONGING Session
Saturday, 23 November 2013
3pm - 4.40pm (3 films)
Q&A with Sari Braithwaite, director of "Homebound"

A038_C006_1226SJ
*WINNER PEOPLE'S CHOICE AWARD

Monk by Blood / Japan / Ema Ryan Yamazaki / Japan / 2013 / 25 min

Theatrical World Premiere
watch trailer

When 21-year-old Scion Sasaki was born into his family as the oldest son, he was also born with the destiny of taking over his family's Buddhist temple in Kyoto - a temple that has existed for 800 years, handed down by his ancestors for 23 generations. Scion must face his destiny while balancing his lifestyle as a DJ and his dream of becoming a chef. Scion is caught between East and West, and between his family's traditions and a globalizing world, How does Scion approach his youth, knowing what awaits him in the future? Monky By Blood is the story of Scion's life and the multiple worlds he juggles.

About the director
Ema Ryan Yamazaki is a documentary filmmaker and film editor. Raised in Japan and England, Ema has a particular interest in telling stories that lie in-between cultures. Her most recent documentary, MONKY BY BLOOD, the story of a young Japanese man who has the destiny to take over his family's 800-year-old Buddhist temple in Kyoto, aired internationally on Al Jazeera English in July 2013. Her film NEITHER HERE NOR THERE, a documentary about growing up in multiple cultures, has screened at venues and educational conferences around the world. Additionally, her work has screened on HBO, PBS, Cannes Film Festival, Telluride Film Festival and the Director's Guild of America among many others. Currently residing in New York City, Ema is a graduate of New York University's Tisch School of the Arts.

--

15_Where I Go_still
Where I Go / Cambodia / Kavich Neang / Cambodia / 2013 / 56 min

Australian Premiere
watch trailer

San Pattica is a mixed Cambodian-Cameroonian son whose father came to work in Cambodia in 1992-1993, a period of the first Cambodia election after the Khmer Rouge regime collapsed. Since his parents left home for many years, Pattica was raised by his grandmother. Challenge and difficulty in his family forced his grandmother to bring Pattica to study and live in an orphanage in Phom Penh, the capital of Cambodia. Pattica has become more interested in knowing about his own identity since he is a victim of discrimination in his daily life.

About the director
Kavich Neang, a filmmaker, is currently graduated in Professional Design at Limkokwing University in Phnom Penh. In 2010, he was selected to make a documentary under the guidance of filmmaker Rithy Panh to produce his third short documentary called "A Scale Boy". Nowadays, Kavich is a member of Kon Khmer Kon Khmer (Cambodian Film, Cambodian Generations), a Cambodian youth film club, and he works with youth to produce films in Cambodia. Currently Kavich is working on his first feature length documentary called "The Night Seekers". In the future, Kavich wants to direct many films talking about current issues in Cambodia.

--

16 Homebound_still
Homebound / Australia & Bangladesh / Sari Braithwaite / Australia / 2013 / 5 min

Melbourne Premiere

He is Indigenous, but he is invisible...even within his homeland of Bangladesh. Set against the humdrum of suburban Melbourne, a young student living in Australia has become an unlikely dissident. Online day and night, he streams updates to his people under attack, sharing their story with the world media. But what will it be like to return home?

About the director
Sari Braithwaite is a Melbourne based filmmaker and researcher. She was Programming Manager at the Human Rights Arts and Film Festival for the 2012 and 2013 Festivals.

Eventbrite button_free tickets

Back to Top

CLOSING FILM
Saturday, 23 November 2013
5pm - 7pm
The festival will be closed with an Award Ceremony

17_Stori Tumbuna_still
*WINNER AWESOME AWARD

Stori Tumbuna / Papua New Guinea / Paul Wolffram / New Zealand / 2011 / 89 min

Australian Premiere
watch trailer

Stori Tumbuna: Ancestors’ Tales was conceived as an opportunity for the Lak to tell their stories in their way. The film was shot over several years and takes its structure from the traditional mythologies of the region. Unlike most films based on the lives of traditional communities that are told from the point of view of an outsider this film adopts indigenous narrative structures and presents a collaborative account that privileges local points of view and the Lak ethos.

About the director
Paul lives in Wellington with his wife and two children. Over the past ten years working with Melanesian people in Papua New Guinea Paul has contracted malaria six times, been bitten by a snake, gashed by several wild pigs, and collected a number of skin funguses. Paul has worked with a number of Pacific communities creating documentaries on subjects and stories that are important to the people he works with. He has worked with the Banaban people, a displaced Micronesian culture now relocated to the Fijian Islands, the Tokelauan community, on a film about traditional women’s arts, and with the Deaf community in New Zealand. Paul’s films have been screened internationally and his ethnographic film work in the Pacific is currently playing in several international film festivals.

Eventbrite button_free tickets

Back to Top

We hope you'll enjoy the films!

Check out what else is on 2013 Festival Program
Free tickets are available now on: http://2013aperturefestival.eventbrite.com.au

Click to download Festival Schedule (pdf)
Click to download Festival Booklet (pdf)
Click to download Festival Poster (A4)